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From the article:

“It’s true that vitamin C does react with oxidized lipids to form potential genotoxins,” said Balz Frei, professor and director of the Linus Pauling Institute, and co-author on this study. “But the process does not stop there. We found in human studies that the remaining vitamin C in the body continues to react with these toxins to form conjugates - different types of molecules with a covalent bond - that appear to be harmless.

In human tests, the OSU scientists found in blood plasma extraordinarily high levels of these conjugates, which show this protective effect of vitamin C against toxic lipids.

“Prior to this, we never knew what indicators to look for that would demonstrate the protective role of vitamin C against oxidized lipids,” Stevens said. “Now that we see them, it becomes very clear how vitamin C can provide a protective role against these oxidized lipids and the toxins derived from them. And this isn’t just test tube chemistry, this is the way our bodies work.

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