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I’ve been using SELF Nutrition Data (e.g. kale) since it’s convenient and seems to cover most things. But I’ve no idea how accurate/reliable it’s data sources are and the search can be fairly awkward with some (fairly basic whole) foods seemingly missing altogether. So, any other recommendations people?

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    The data is as reliable as it can get, as SELF Nutrition Data - like most such frontends, of which it is one of the best - is based on the official USDA Nutrient Database[1], which is the World’s most comprehensive nutrient database extensively referenced in scientific literature.

    I like the “Nutrition Facts” android app[2]. It has a very simple interface and it keeps the database offline, so you can use it anytime and anywhere on your smartphone to quickly look up the nutrient content of a particular food. For advanced features, like long-term tracking of nutrient intake, the website CRON-O-Meter[3] (also availabale as an app) provides you with all you’ll ever need.

    Note that not all frontends display all information available in the USDA database, and some may be based on an outdated version. If you want the most complete, reliable and up-to-date information, you should consult the original USDA database, even if the interface is a bit awkward.

    The only downside of the USDA database is that the information on non-nutritive compounds like polyphenols is rather scarce. This is a gap the Phenol-Explorer[4] database is supposed to fill, which integrates the results from most scientific studies measuring polyphenols in foodstuff. Being provided for scientific research purposes, however, it requires some knowledge to use.

    1. http://ndb.nal.usda.gov/
    2. https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=nutrition.facts.guide
    3. https://cronometer.com/
    4. http://www.phenol-explorer.eu/
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      Incidentally, one thing I’d currently like to be able to do is assess my calcium intake independently; being on a paleo-style diet (mostly for food intolerance reasons), the best UK (NHS) dietetic advice informs me that I must consume significant amounts of supplemental calcium or fortified ‘milk’, if not taking any dairy. Whereas nutritional advisors have reassured me that leafy greens are sufficient (and magnesium intake is more worthwhile supplementing).

      I have low bone density (of the spine) as a minor concern, and am aware of the other known factors affecting this (from micro-nutrients to load bearing exercise).

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        CRON-O-Meter (see the link above) should be an ideal tool do this.

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          Greens are high in calcium and is where I get most of my calcium. The micronutrient smoothie I make has a total of Here is my recipe. Also, you may want to look into the vitamin D receptor polymorphism Bsm1 that is associated with low BMD (particularly in the spine). You get get a 23andMe test and use promethease to understand data. I discuss this here. Also, vitamin K2 is important to make sure the calcium gets out of blood vessels and to the bone.

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            Hi, thanks for replying. My Vit D BSM (rs1544410) call is normal -/-, but serum D levels have tested low in previous years. I struggled to raise it much so am currently undertaking more assertive supplementation. Taking K2 and A in conjunction (plus vit C, Bs multi-mineral mix, etc, currently).

            Regarding the smoothie:

            [A] Why is there no stated magnesium in the flax milk section? Won’t that totally change the overall totals? (Also asked on YouTube.)

            [B] How much of that calcium and magnesium, respectively might be expected in (well pressed) juice? I’m hesitant to consume that much (blended) fibre, given gut issues.

            [C] May vegetable folate (folinic?) compete/interfere with active folate (methyl) supplementation. I’ve currently been trying dipping into the ‘Freddd protocol’ for my CFS.

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              Have you looked at your cypr21 that I mention in my report? This polymorphism is also associated with lower 25OHD.
              Hmm…forgot about flaxmilk…I guess because people switch out what they use (flax, almond, coconut, water) I did not want to include that in my calculation.

              Folate and folinic should be used in both pathways unless have MTHFR, in which case they would not compete.

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                CYP2R1 - I have 1 good, 1 homozygous bad, 1 no call. And I find the promethease report structure confused, so made my own custom report in LiveWello:

                Image (colour coded report table, like genetic genie).

                My report share (requires sign in).

                Template (shared with community, hope that is ok).

                I’m currently supplementing ~10000IU/day of D3, including emulsion drops and capsules. My serum levels peaked at 91nmol/L (36.4ng/L) after a summer of daily sun exposure and a winter of ~2000IU/day supplementation, have since fallen to 73nmol/L (1 year later without supplements). But just one of many things I’m working on currently.

                Hmm…forgot about flaxmilk… I did not want to include that in my calculation

                You appear to have included flax milks' calcium contribution, and (some of?) the other nutrients, but not the magnesium. Hence I pointed it out, because it greatly distorts the apparent overall balance in the total. (Spreadsheet malfunction?) I couldn’t find nutrition data for flax milk, however, but I assume there’d be a lot of magnesium, as in the seed form.

                Folate and folinic should be used in both pathways unless have MTHFR, in which case they would not compete.

                Erm, so methylfolate will compete with vegetable folate unless one has (homozygous?) MTHFR C677T (rs1801133) SNP?? (Freddd insists veg folate, and Folic acid, block active types for him (and others), although RichVanK seemed skeptical of generalising all those findings. Familiar with those two?)

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                  I’m currently supplementing ~10000IU/day of D3, including emulsion drops and capsules. My serum levels peaked at 91nmol/L (36.4ng/L) after a summer of daily sun exposure and a winter of ~2000IU/day supplementation, have since fallen to 73nmol/L (1 year later without supplements). But just one of many things I’m working on currently.

                  Wow, those vitamin D levels seem low considering…

                  You appear to have included flax milks' calcium contribution, and (some of?) the other nutrients, but not the magnesium. Hence I pointed it out, because it greatly distorts the apparent overall balance in the total. (Spreadsheet malfunction?) I couldn’t find nutrition data for flax milk, however, but I assume there’d be a lot of magnesium, as in the seed form.

                  Magnesium is in flaxseed but I’m not sure how much is actually in flaxmilk. Would have to do some reading…

                  Erm, so methylfolate will compete with vegetable folate unless one has (homozygous?) MTHFR C677T (rs1801133) SNP?? (Freddd insists veg folate, and Folic acid, block active types for him (and others), although RichVanK seemed skeptical of generalising all those findings. Familiar with those two?)

                  Folate from plants would NOT compete in anyone but folic acid could. Not familiar with any on the names you mentioned.